Omerta: Drumpf, Ryan, GOP, Russia.

The GOP top brass, on how Russia screwed the Dems, and helped Drumpf:

That’s when McCarthy brought the conversation about Russian meddling around to the DNC hack, Trump and Rohrabacher.

“I’ll guarantee you that’s what it is…The Russians hacked the DNC and got the opp [opposition] research that they had on Trump,” McCarthy said with a laugh.

Ryan asked who the Russians “delivered” the opposition research to.

“There’s… there’s two people, I think, Putin pays: Rohrabacher and Trump,” McCarthy said, drawing some laughter. “Swear to God,” McCarthy added.

House majority leader to colleagues in 2016: ‘I think Putin pays’ Trump, May 18, 2017 at 12:46AM

The same GOP top brass swearing to Omerta:

“This is an off the record,” Ryan said.

Some lawmakers laughed at that.

“No leaks, alright?,” Ryan said, adding: “This is how we know we’re a real family here.”

“That’s how you know that we’re tight,” Scalise said.

“What’s said in the family stays in the family,” Ryan added.

FU (and your rights) Softbank! But will you please fund us a bit more, please!

In today’s news: Ola says fuck you to its biggest investor.

… a person close to Ola’s board said the co-founders and some smaller investors made the changes to specifically put restrictions on SoftBank.

Ola’s founders have strengthened their rights relative to SoftBank despite the fact that SoftBank has recently increased its stake in the company after pumping an additional $250 million into Ola in November.

SoftBank owns nearly 40% of Ola, which also counts Matrix Partners, Tiger Global, Sequoia Capital, Steadview Capital, Accel Partners and others as investors.

Snapdeal effect? Ola restricts SoftBank rights, strengthens those of founders, May 18, 2017, at 06:34 PM

Also, in today’s news: Ola finding it hard to raise more funding

It is looking for more but funds have been tough to come by as potential investors have backed off from putting cash into an Uber rival in a sector that is yet to prove it can deliver profits.

Seth’s Godin: In defence of the tree emoji 🌳

The tree emoji celebrates the patient and generous acts of planting seeds, watering them, caring for them, and then, in a generation, you have a tree.

Simple growth. With patience. (I prefer the deciduous tree instead of the evergreen, because the leaves coming in and falling off are part of the deal).

Put me down for the tree emoji.

🌳

Seth’s Blog: In defence of the tree emoji, May 9, 2017, at 01:10 AM

Fred Wilson’s golden rules for investing – averaging & rebalancing

Two of my favorite techniques in investing are dollar cost averaging (when buying and selling) and rebalancing.

In public stocks and other marketable assets, these techniques (averaging in and out) are particularly important. I believe you can spot a long term trend and ride it. But I do not believe you can spot a market bottom or top until it is in the rear view mirror. So that is why I like to average into and out of a position over time.

Rebalancing is even more important. If you have a position that has worked incredibly well and it starts to become a very large portion of your overall portfolio, it is wise to take some of that position off the table and reinvest it in other attractive assets. This gives you more diversification, which I believe is generally a good thing, and also de-risks your portfolio from a big selloff in the largest position.

Rebalancing – AVC, May 10, 2017, at 12:09 PM

Tobacco industry’s 4 step plan to eliminate inconvenient facts

First, the industry appeared to engage, promising high-quality research into the issue. The public were assured that the best people were on the case.

The second stage was to complicate the question and sow doubt: lung cancer might have any number of causes, after all. And wasn’t lung cancer, not cigarettes, what really mattered?

Stage three was to undermine serious research and expertise. Autopsy reports would be dismissed as anecdotal, epidemiological work as merely statistical, and animal studies as irrelevant.

Finally came normalisation: the industry would point out that the tobacco-cancer story was stale news. Couldn’t journalists find something new and interesting to say?

The Problem With Facts, April 24, 2017, at 10:13 AM