From an obituary in The Economist…

Carluccio the brand had come to obscure the man. The glossy stores were too far removed from handling and making things. They were too far from the woods and the joys of gathering, but that was the life that was true to him. The motto he chose was in natura veritas. In Nature lay his truth

Antonio Carluccio died on November 8th

The obituary in the Economist is frequently a piece of art – better than the best editorial in most other news organisations. I live reading them 🙂

P.S.: Carluccio’s on St John’s Wood high street was also our first frequently visited Italian place, in our first year in the UK 🙂

Advertisements

No surprises here: ice-cream for dogs outsells ice-cream for humans

Last summer the firm added a range of ice-creams for dogs, including Carrot Crunch and Old Sock flavours, to the desserts on sale in its pubs, and ended up selling more ice-cream to canines than to human customers.

Family-owned firms hold part of the answer to the productivity puzzle, December 9, 2017 at 11:15PM

As my wife loves to point out: our dog has the highest personal expense budget of the three of us.

Britain’s politics for the old, strangling its young

One in three of Britain’s houses has two or more spare bedrooms. Yet overcrowding (as measured by the number of people relative to the number of bedrooms) is rising. With grandparents hogging the bigger, better properties, their children struggle to move up the housing ladder.

The way council tax is levied also gives elderly folk less incentive to downsize. It was last updated in 1993 and the priciest homes are taxed lightly.

A little-noticed change in Britain’s housing market spells trouble for everybody, August 8, 2017 at 09:50AM

A statement everyone in India will agree with…

WHEN Narendra Modi became prime minister of India in 2014, opinion was divided as to whether he was a Hindu zealot disguised as an economic reformer, or the other way round. The past three years appear to have settled the matter.

India’s prime minister is not as much of a reformer as he seems, August 5, 2017 at 11:33PM

It couldn’t have been more ambiguous 🙂

‘Our way of life’

“Southern food has never been static…[Traditionalists] feared for the ‘southern way of life’, then stammered when asked to define it.”

Cooking in the American south, August 8, 2017 at 10:40AM

This is true of everyone, everywhere who pushes against change with a defence of ‘destroying our way of life’. And politicians understand it. It’s easy to get people to agree against a thing, especially change, than to agree for a thing – even their definition of ‘way of life’.