Britain’s politics for the old, strangling its young

One in three of Britain’s houses has two or more spare bedrooms. Yet overcrowding (as measured by the number of people relative to the number of bedrooms) is rising. With grandparents hogging the bigger, better properties, their children struggle to move up the housing ladder.

The way council tax is levied also gives elderly folk less incentive to downsize. It was last updated in 1993 and the priciest homes are taxed lightly.

A little-noticed change in Britain’s housing market spells trouble for everybody, August 8, 2017 at 09:50AM

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A statement everyone in India will agree with…

WHEN Narendra Modi became prime minister of India in 2014, opinion was divided as to whether he was a Hindu zealot disguised as an economic reformer, or the other way round. The past three years appear to have settled the matter.

India’s prime minister is not as much of a reformer as he seems, August 5, 2017 at 11:33PM

It couldn’t have been more ambiguous 🙂

‘Our way of life’

“Southern food has never been static…[Traditionalists] feared for the ‘southern way of life’, then stammered when asked to define it.”

Cooking in the American south, August 8, 2017 at 10:40AM

This is true of everyone, everywhere who pushes against change with a defence of ‘destroying our way of life’. And politicians understand it. It’s easy to get people to agree against a thing, especially change, than to agree for a thing – even their definition of ‘way of life’.

The fertile world of Nigerian patois

The Pidgin phrase Naija no dey carry last, roughly meaning “Nigerians strive to finish first”, has become an unofficial national motto (as well as the title of a book satirising the country).

The fertile world of Nigerian patois, August 8, 2017 at 10:56AM

The celebrated novelist Chinua Achebe’s defence of writing in English, rather than his native Igbo, would ring true today whether spoken by politician or pop star. “We intend to do unheard-of things with it.”

Machines:Horses::AI: Humans?

In the developed world they have been replaced with machines.

The irony is hard to miss: humans tamed horses and put them to work until they invented something that worked at greater speed and lower cost, which replaced them. Could humans one day make themselves obsolescent in the same way?

How the horse made history, August 4, 2017 at 01:53AM